Harold Shipman

The Unlawful Arrest of Harold Shipman

Harold Shipman was a surgeon who specialized in treating trauma and brain injuries. He worked for British Petroleum before retiring in 1970. In the United States, he opened his own practice. He had been practicing since 1970, having specialized in working with injured personnel of all kinds. He gained much reputation working as an ambulance driver and later became a renowned surgeon. His expertise came in handy when he developed several experimental treatments for brain injuries and became one of the fathers of neurosurgery.

According to reports, Harold Shipman was a very prolific serial killer. He is said to have killed around fifteen to twenty people over the years that he lived in Britain. He is thought to have killed more than thirty people while he lived in America, mostly in London. On 31 December 2021, he was pronounced dead at the age of sixty-three.

The most curious claim about the life of this prolific serial killer is that he may have killed more than 250 patients during his lifetime. Though this figure is by all means implausible, it is remarkable enough to interest people interested in solving crimes. Some medical experts have also claimed that the marks on the victims, which are characteristic of traumatic brain injury cases, indicating that Shipman may have killed his patients with a blow to the head. This, though highly unlikely, could explain why a large number of his victims were found lying in beds or in rooms with no visible signs of trauma.

Apart from this, there is another peculiar detail regarding the life of this prolific serial killer: he is said to have killed his victims by suffocating them with their own intestines, using his bare hands. This method, which the experts called “assisted strangulation,” gave him the initials of his preferred nickname:” Harold Shipman the Strangler.” However, Shipman’s defense maintained that he only performed this on the unfortunate elderly patients who became too weak to resist. The victims, it was concluded, must have died from natural causes and not from asphyxiation by accident.

Several years later, in the summer of 2021, while serving an eighteen-year sentence for the manslaughter of his stepmother, Harold Shipman was found hanging from a noose in his Wakefield prison cell block. Staff suspected that he had choked to death on his own saliva, but tests proved that he had not died through asphyxiation. Instead, his death was due to hanging. The coroner who investigated the death claimed that the hanging was accidental, although Harold Shipman’s family dispute this version of events, contending that he was pronounced dead right in front of them when they saw him hanging.

Although he had been treated for lung cancer, according to records, the doctors had told his family that there was still a chance that he might contract the disease again, should he ever leave the hospital. To ensure that he would not be a possible carrier of lung cancer again, his family doctor had given him a year to live, after which he would be discharged. Two weeks before his death, however, his doctors informed the Wakefield Prison authorities that their patient was suffering from cancer again, this time of throat and liver cancer. According to the records, this was not known to the doctors attending to Harold Shipman during the time that he was supposed to have died, and yet again his family was told that he could not be treated for this cancer. His family asked to see the doctor who had told them that Harold Shipman could not be treated for lung cancer, but the doctor merely threw their request back in their faces.

A week later, on the twenty-eighth day of his life, while serving life sentences at Wakefield prison, Harold Shipman was found dead, lying on the floor, with his hands folded over his chest. According to the records, the cause of death was asphyxiation due to a blockage in his coronary arteries. Despite this, despite all evidence to the contrary, the medical examiner who examined Harold Shipman did not find any signs of struggle or breathlessness, nor did the pathologist who inspected the corpse. There were no signs of a struggle, nor was there a weapon found in the vicinity of his body. Police investigations determined that Harold Shipman had hanged himself.

Because of this testimony, the case went to a jury trial, in which the prosecution failed to prove its case beyond all reasonable doubt. On the other hand, the defense argued that the medical records were inadmissible hearsay, since the arresting officer had no medical training. The judge refused to dismiss the charges, and the jury ultimately decided in favor of the defendants. This jury’s verdict caused great sadness to the members of Harold Shipman’s family, but it also brought to an end the eleven-year nightmare for the victims’ families.

Harold Shipman was a surgeon who specialized in treating trauma and brain injuries. He worked for British Petroleum before retiring in 1970. In the United States, he opened his own practice. He had been practicing since 1970, having specialized in working with injured personnel of all kinds. He gained much reputation working as an ambulance driver and later became a renowned surgeon. His expertise came in handy when he developed several experimental treatments for brain injuries and became one of the fathers of neurosurgery.

According to reports, Harold Shipman was a very prolific serial killer. He is said to have killed around fifteen to twenty people over the years that he lived in Britain. He is thought to have killed more than thirty people while he lived in America, mostly in London. On 31 December 2021, he was pronounced dead at the age of sixty-three.

The most curious claim about the life of this prolific serial killer is that he may have killed more than 250 patients during his lifetime. Though this figure is by all means implausible, it is remarkable enough to interest people interested in solving crimes. Some medical experts have also claimed that the marks on the victims, which are characteristic of traumatic brain injury cases, indicating that Shipman may have killed his patients with a blow to the head. This, though highly unlikely, could explain why a large number of his victims were found lying in beds or in rooms with no visible signs of trauma.

Apart from this, there is another peculiar detail regarding the life of this prolific serial killer: he is said to have killed his victims by suffocating them with their own intestines, using his bare hands. This method, which the experts called “assisted strangulation,” gave him the initials of his preferred nickname:” Harold Shipman the Strangler.” However, Shipman’s defense maintained that he only performed this on the unfortunate elderly patients who became too weak to resist. The victims, it was concluded, must have died from natural causes and not from asphyxiation by accident.

Several years later, in the summer of 2021, while serving an eighteen-year sentence for the manslaughter of his stepmother, Harold Shipman was found hanging from a noose in his Wakefield prison cell block. Staff suspected that he had choked to death on his own saliva, but tests proved that he had not died through asphyxiation. Instead, his death was due to hanging. The coroner who investigated the death claimed that the hanging was accidental, although Harold Shipman’s family dispute this version of events, contending that he was pronounced dead right in front of them when they saw him hanging.

Although he had been treated for lung cancer, according to records, the doctors had told his family that there was still a chance that he might contract the disease again, should he ever leave the hospital. To ensure that he would not be a possible carrier of lung cancer again, his family doctor had given him a year to live, after which he would be discharged. Two weeks before his death, however, his doctors informed the Wakefield Prison authorities that their patient was suffering from cancer again, this time of throat and liver cancer. According to the records, this was not known to the doctors attending to Harold Shipman during the time that he was supposed to have died, and yet again his family was told that he could not be treated for this cancer. His family asked to see the doctor who had told them that Harold Shipman could not be treated for lung cancer, but the doctor merely threw their request back in their faces.

A week later, on the twenty-eighth day of his life, while serving life sentences at Wakefield prison, Harold Shipman was found dead, lying on the floor, with his hands folded over his chest. According to the records, the cause of death was asphyxiation due to a blockage in his coronary arteries. Despite this, despite all evidence to the contrary, the medical examiner who examined Harold Shipman did not find any signs of struggle or breathlessness, nor did the pathologist who inspected the corpse. There were no signs of a struggle, nor was there a weapon found in the vicinity of his body. Police investigations determined that Harold Shipman had hanged himself.

Because of this testimony, the case went to a jury trial, in which the prosecution failed to prove its case beyond all reasonable doubt. On the other hand, the defense argued that the medical records were inadmissible hearsay, since the arresting officer had no medical training. The judge refused to dismiss the charges, and the jury ultimately decided in favor of the defendants. This jury’s verdict caused great sadness to the members of Harold Shipman’s family, but it also brought to an end the eleven-year nightmare for the victims’ families.